Find a Business Near: Ohio

Below is a list of all cities within the State of Ohio in which we have business listings. If you do not see your city within the list below, You can add a business for just $49.95 per year. To add a business submit your info here.


Find a Business Near: Ohio

Population for Ohio: 11,533,561

Total Males: 5,630,373
Total Females: 5,903,188
Median Household Income: $48,246
Total Households: 4,555,709
Choose A City In Ohio


Number of Firms, Establishments, Employment, and Payroll by Employee Size for Ohio (2015)
STATE EMPLOYMENT SIZE FIRMS ESTABLISHMENTS EMPLOYMENT ANNUAL PAYROLL (1,000)
Ohio 01: Total 185,470 251,668 4,719,985 $213,161,303
Ohio 02: 0-4 99,228 99,419 171,189 $6,656,801
Ohio 03: 5-9 34,293 34,718 226,597 $7,659,274
Ohio 04: 10-19 22,470 23,655 300,957 $10,840,454
Ohio 05: <20 155,991 157,792 698,743 $25,156,529
Ohio 06: 20-99 20,389 26,584 773,875 $30,238,255
Ohio 07: 100-499 4,999 14,828 699,349 $30,093,107
Ohio 08: <500 181,379 199,204 2,171,967 $85,487,891
Ohio 09: 500+ 4,091 52,464 2,548,018 $127,673,412
Green Initiatives & Environmental History for: Ohio

Basic History

Ohio was first explored for France in 1669, but became British property after the French and Indian Wars. It was acquired by the U.S. after the Revolutionary War in 1783. In 1788, the first permanent settlement was established. The 1790s saw severe fighting with the Indians in Ohio. It was part of the vast area ceded to the United States by the Treaty of Paris. Ohio became a territory in 1799. In 1802 a state convention drafted a constitution, and in 1803 Ohio entered the Union.

Environmental History

More than 2,500 plant species have been found in Ohio. The pitch pine, bigleaf magnolia, sourwood, witch-hazel, pawpaw, hornbeam, various dogwoods, species of oak, maple, poplar, ash, elm, hickory, birch, beech grow in the state, along with butternut, black walnut, wild black cherry, black locust, and sycamore. The eastern prairie fringed orchid, lakeside daisy and running buffalo clover are now listed endangered. White-tailed deer, badger, mink, raccoon, red and gray foxes, coyote, beaver, eastern cottontail, woodchuck, and opossum are found throughout the state’s wildlife districts. Acting on the premise that the largest problem facing wildlife is the destruction of their habitat, the Division of Wildlife of the Department of Natural Resources has instituted an ambitious endangered species program. 20 Ohio animal species are now endangered or threatened, including the bald eagle, Indiana bat, and piping plover.

Green Initiatives

With a commitment to green operations Ohio is implementing a wide variety green initiatives including: laundry water recycling and filtration system which conserves an estimated 26 million gallons of water each year; a food composting system; installation of Energy Control Systems in rooms of buildings and offices; advanced lighting control systems; transition to energy saving fluorescent light bulbs; motion sensor lights in public areas; upgrading to digital thermostats; low energy consumption water pumps in parks, and more. By actively trying to reduce carbon footprint, PITT Ohio is at the forefront in preserving the environment. They treat their business practices with an environmentally conscious approach. Their goal is to promote construction and maintenance of buildings that are environmentally responsible, efficient and healthy places to work. They work everyday to reduce carbon footprint by improving vehicle practices and retro fitting their facilities. PITT Ohio vehicles follow ‘no idling’ program that eliminates excess waste and pollution. Other facilities include: replacement of light bulb with more energy-efficient fluorescent compact eco bulbs; use of appliances that are Energy Star rated; use of touch-less faucets in kitchens and restrooms; engaging in waste product and paper recycling programs; engaging in clean-up programs like picking up litter, landscaping, gardening, etc.; using biodiesel and hybrid vehicles with a view to improving transportation, and reducing air pollution, green house gas emissions, and improving fuel efficiency.

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