Find a Business Near: Alaska

Below is a list of all cities within the State of Alaska in which we have business listings. If you do not see your city within the list below, You can add a business for just $49.95 per year. To add a business submit your info here.

Find a Business Near: Alaska

Population for Alaska: 7,33,391

Total Males: 384,653
Total Females: 352,337
Median Household Income: $77,790
Total Households: 255,173
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Choose A City In Alaska


Number of Firms, Establishments, Employment, and Payroll by Employee Size for Alaska (2020)
STATE ENTERPRISE SIZE FIRMS ESTABLISHMENTS EMPLOYMENT ANNUAL PAYROLL (1,000)
Alaska 01: Total 17,365 21,399 2,64,971 $1,65,71,790
Alaska 02: <5 employees 10,398 10,435 14,795 $9,23,333
Alaska 03: 5-9 employees 2,965 3,022 19,615 $8,93,546
Alaska 04:10-14 employees 1,169 1,240 13,530 $6,70,531
Alaska 05: 15-19 employees 575 632 9,576 $4,88,619
Alaska 06: <20 employees 15,107 15,329 57,516 $29,76,029
Alaska 07: 20-24 employees 342 422 7,242 $3,77,493
Alaska 08: 25-29 employees 226 294 5,857 $2,98,235
Alaska 09: 30-34 employees 162 225 4,971 $2,39,246
Alaska 10: 35-39 employees 110 157 3,692 $2,06,196
Alaska 11: 40-49 employees 146 224 5,806 $3,04,944
Alaska 12: 50-74 employees 199 404 10,824 $5,79,164
Alaska 13: 75-99 employees 89 188 6,109 $4,28,635
Alaska 14: 100-149 employees 118 332 10,897 $5,79,719
Alaska 15: 150-199 employees 52 239 6,052 $3,17,199
Alaska 16: 200-299 employees 68 277 8,546 $5,22,343
Alaska 17: 300-399 employees 44 157 6,156 $4,00,506
Alaska 18: 400-499 employees 28 82 4,849 $3,14,137
Alaska 19: <500 employees 16,691 18,330 1,38,517 $75,43,846
Alaska 20: 500-749 employees 58 221 7,866 $5,44,469
Alaska 21: 750-999 employees 37 209 7,819 $7,29,499
Alaska 22: 1,000-1,499 employees 54 244 13,040 $6,61,648
Alaska 23: 1,500-1,999 employees 34 161 7,184 $4,79,243
Alaska 24: 2,000-2,499 employees 30 182 7,838 $7,62,213
Alaska 25: 2,500-4,999 employees 86 317 12,369 $9,92,124
Alaska 26: 5,000+ employees 375 1,735 70,338 $48,58,748
Green Initiatives & Environmental History for: Alaska

Basic History

Alaska was sold to the United States in the year 1867, but the US purchase was derisively called a folly for many years after that because of the land’s supposed uselessness. Alaska appeared to offer no immediate financial return as it remained neglected. It was not until the discovery of gold in 1880 that Alaska was given a governor and a feeble local administration. The first gold finds tremendously influenced Alaska, and was followed by a period of rapid building and development. A new era began for Alaska when local government was established in the year 1912. On January the 3rd 1959, Alaska was officially admitted into the Union as a state.

Environmental History

Life zones in Alaska range from grasslands, mountains, and tundra to thick forests. Various hardy plants and wild flowers spring up during the short growing season on the tundra plains. Species of poppy and gentian are endangered. Mammals abound amid the wilderness. Kodiak, polar, black and grizzly bears, Dall sheep and an abundance of small mammals are also found. Pristine lakes and streams are famous for trout and salmon fishing. Seven species listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service included the Eskimo curlew, short-tailed albatross, leatherback sea turtle, steller sea-lion, and bowhead, finback and humpback whales. Three species listed as threatened included the spectacled aider, Steller’s aider and Steller sea-lion.

Green Initiatives

CIRI Alaska Tourism, Sustain2Green organization, Green Community Initiatives, and many such organizations provide educational opportunities, programs and activities for children and adults alike, to promote the value of plant materials through education, preservation and research, also supplying products that provide one with environmentally friendly oxo/bio-degradable alternatives. They are proving that green isn’t just a good philosophy, but also good business. Environmentally-responsible choices inform the way they do business. They take active steps in spreading the awareness that improving energy efficiency, waste reduction and other eco-friendly measures are good for business as well as the planet. Amongst other measures implemented, they recycle oil containers; use timers on lighting and shut off lights every night to decrease electricity usage; use compact and fluorescent light bulbs and recycle paper, glass, cardboard, batteries. Participating in a carbon offset program, these organizations are promoting the further development of new Alaska renewable energy resources.