Find a Business Near: Oklahoma

Below is a list of all cities within the State of Oklahoma in which we have business listings. If you do not see your city within the list below, You can add a business for just $49.95 per year. To add a business submit your info here.

Find a Business Near: Oklahoma

Population for Oklahoma: 3,959,353

Total Males: 1,956,617
Total Females: 1,992,725
Median Household Income: $53,840
Total Households: 1,493,569
Find Cities That Begin With The Following Letters:
Choose A City In Oklahoma


Number of Firms, Establishments, Employment, and Payroll by Employee Size for Oklahoma (2020)
STATE ENTERPRISE SIZE FIRMS ESTABLISHMENTS EMPLOYMENT ANNUAL PAYROLL (1,000)
Oklahoma 01: Total 73,321 93,761 14,04,725 $6,52,27,101
Oklahoma 02: <5 employees 43,127 43,197 70,587 $28,37,134
Oklahoma 03: 5-9 employees 11,978 12,098 78,739 $27,59,642
Oklahoma 04:10-14 employees 4,856 5,059 56,420 $20,47,371
Oklahoma 05: 15-19 employees 2,463 2,671 40,700 $15,32,067
Oklahoma 06: <20 employees 62,424 63,025 2,46,446 $91,76,214
Oklahoma 07: 20-24 employees 1,622 1,811 34,827 $12,71,078
Oklahoma 08: 25-29 employees 1,069 1,228 28,152 $10,02,284
Oklahoma 09: 30-34 employees 785 968 24,031 $9,79,244
Oklahoma 10: 35-39 employees 646 845 22,968 $9,00,703
Oklahoma 11: 40-49 employees 900 1,220 37,944 $15,14,565
Oklahoma 12: 50-74 employees 1,143 1,761 62,380 $25,09,804
Oklahoma 13: 75-99 employees 612 1,198 45,377 $18,80,867
Oklahoma 14: 100-149 employees 608 1,283 53,900 $22,92,227
Oklahoma 15: 150-199 employees 372 908 43,878 $20,14,793
Oklahoma 16: 200-299 employees 399 1,375 55,691 $25,84,834
Oklahoma 17: 300-399 employees 236 862 33,435 $15,78,336
Oklahoma 18: 400-499 employees 167 655 29,004 $13,32,037
Oklahoma 19: <500 employees 70,983 77,139 7,18,033 $2,90,36,986
Oklahoma 20: 500-749 employees 302 1,168 45,881 $23,77,916
Oklahoma 21: 750-999 employees 180 902 41,449 $17,57,367
Oklahoma 22: 1,000-1,499 employees 253 943 43,163 $24,60,182
Oklahoma 23: 1,500-1,999 employees 162 600 34,113 $19,58,893
Oklahoma 24: 2,000-2,499 employees 148 620 31,636 $19,95,507
Oklahoma 25: 2,500-4,999 employees 391 1,840 70,072 $43,05,664
Oklahoma 26: 5,000+ employees 902 10,549 4,20,378 $2,13,34,586
Green Initiatives & Environmental History for: Oklahoma

Basic History

The Spanish were the first to explore the region in 1541. The U.S. acquired most of Oklahoma in 1803 from France. Set aside as Indian territory in 1834, the region was divided into Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory on May 2nd, 1890. The two were combined to make a new state, Oklahoma, on November 16th, 1907.

Environmental History

Grasses grow in abundance in Oklahoma. Bluestem, buffalo, sand lovegrass are native. Deciduous hardwoods stand in eastern Oklahoma, and red and yellow cactus blossoms brighten the area in the northwest. The western prairie fringed orchid has been listed as threatened. The white-tailed deer, Rio Grande wild turkeys, pronghorn antelope, elk, and a few herds of American buffalo (bison) inhabit the region. Among the state’s 19 endangered or threatened species of wildlife are three species of bat (big-eared, Indiana, and gray), bald eagle, whooping crane, red-cockaded woodpecker, Eskimo curlew, and Neosho madtom.

Green Initiatives

Go Green Oklahoma is a government initiative that helps to reduce the carbon footprint by reducing paper consumption. Ethical corporate behavior is being encouraged across the state to promote, create and maintain a healthy environment to enrich lives. The state is supporting and driving green services and products and providing a clean, healthy environment to its citizens while providing a high-quality lifestyle. Some of the initiatives that have been implemented by the state include: green power sourced from sustainable wind power; use and purchase of Energy Star Certified products and appliances; switching from incandescent to CFL; using LED and CFL lighting; promoting native plant landscaping; installation of automatic lighting with a view to save on energy and cut down power consumption; use of properly timed and metered landscape water use; use of high quality insulation combined with high efficiency HVAC systems that keep buildings cools in the summer and warm in the winter; encouraging group transportation, thus saving energy by combining trips and reducing personal car use; using high efficiency laundry machines and dishwashers; reducing paper use and increasing reliance on digital communication; reducing and eliminating the use of disposable items; use of green fabrics and floor coverings; use of zero-voc or low-voc paints; avoiding greenhouse gas emissions by recycling tons of waste instead of sending it to the landfill; and exploring new technology regarding design and operation, including green building, lighting systems, daylighting, HVAC, and insulation.